Affirmation of our blues–fears, anxieties, and doubts– provides a key awareness for our maturation; this awareness is a separation of our sensations from reality. An acknowledgement of where we want to be is our path to healing; speaking about our troubles takes us within our pain and forges a commitment into walking past the threshold. We move beyond the infantile ego by stepping within the most repressed and shameful parts of ourselves; this step is the beginning of our symbolic death. While also the beginning of transformation; an ending to the old self through a annihilation of the parts that serve no purpose in this era of our lives. The necessity to grow my be thrusted upon our consciousness through an awakening of the shortness of life, the illusion of safety, or divinity needing us to fulfill our divine mission; this rebirth is internal, but expresses itself externally. As we let go of the people we have assumed ourselves to be, we can forgive the old self and step into a person that embodies the principles we wish to cherish. Forgiving is a simultaneous acceptance and changing of our actions. Without being able to achieve a higher silence there is no where we can go to escape ourselves. No amount of drugs, sex, or exercise can change the fact that we can never escape ourselves; our sanity is achieved through a metamorphoses within our inner sanctuary and we beginning to shed the skins that no longer fits this time in our lives. Through recognizing the spiritual nature of life and allowing faith to guide of lives we walk a life-renewing and life-centering path. It all begins with the acknowledgment of our blues in order to walk the path where we cease existing; as we shed old habits, thoughts, and actions in order to become our “higher” selves. Death is safe and necessary; our responsibility is proving this statement for posterity. However, while there are many examples proving the necessity of death, the act is completely of responsibility.

The Hero with a Thousand Faces continues to be an extraordinary read; many more essays are inspired from the contents of the book.

Baal with the Thunderbolt